united states of meryl
March 3, 2014
"You are personally responsible for becoming more ethical than the society you grew up in."

— Eliezer Yudkowsky (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: abundance-mine, via sinatragal)

March 3, 2014
"People want to believe gender is something that’s essential, and people repeat these essentialist ideas all the time. “Oh, women do that” and “Oh, men do that” and the reality is that all women don’t anything. We as individuals do what we do, you know, and sometimes that’s informed by gender and sometimes it’s just who we are. And I think all that just makes people really, really uncomfortable because they don’t want to think about who they are."

— Laverne Cox (via lucrezialoveshercesare)

(via elphababa)

March 3, 2014
"When I go to contemporary Asian restaurants, like Wolfgang Puck’s now-shuttered 20.21 in Minneapolis and Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Spice Market in New York City, it seems the entrées are always in the $16–$35 range and the only identifiable person of color in the kitchen is the dishwasher. The menus usually include little blurbs about how the chefs used to backpack in the steaming jungles of the Far East (undoubtedly stuffing all the herbs and spices they could fit into said backpacks along the way, for research purposes), and were so inspired by the smiling faces of the very generous natives—of which there are plenty of tasteful black-and-white photos on the walls, by the way—and the hospitality, oh, the hospitality, that they decided the best way to really crystallize that life-changing experience was to go back home and sterilize the cuisine they experienced by putting some microcilantro on that $20 curry to really make it worthy of the everyday American sophisticate. American chefs like to talk fancy talk about “elevating” or “refining” third-world cuisines, a rhetoric that brings to mind the mission civilisatrice that Europe took on to justify violent takeovers of those same cuisines’ countries of origin. In their publicity materials, Spice Market uses explicitly objectifying language to describe the culture they’re appropriating: “A timeless paean to Southeast Asian sensuality, Spice Market titillates Manhattan’s Meatpacking District with Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s piquant elevations of the region’s street cuisine.” The positioning of Western aesthetics as superior, or higher, than all the rest is, at its bottom line, an expression of the idea that no culture has value unless it has been “improved” by the Western Midas touch. If a dish hasn’t been eaten or reimagined by a white person, does it really exist?

Andrew Zimmern, host of Bizarre Foods, often claims that to know a culture, you must eat their food. I’ve eaten Vietnamese food my whole life, but there’s still so much that I don’t understand about my family and the place we came from. I don’t know why we can be so reticent, yet so emotional; why Catholicism, the invaders’ religion, still has such a hold on them; why we laugh so hard even at times when there’s not much to laugh about. After endless plates of com bi, banh xeo, and cha gio, I still don’t know what my grandmother thinks about when she prays."

— Soleil Ho, “Craving the Other” (via cmao)

(via evatsu)

March 3, 2014
When a (Comparatively) Carefree Blackgirl Wins An Oscar.

(Source: bigtab)

March 3, 2014
queeringcomics:

Cate Blanchett’s acceptance speech may have read feminist, and her wording was beautiful, except her thanking of Woody Allen (whose adopted daughter Dylan Farrow has come out publicly about her abuse at the hand of her proto-father) and intentional framing of him as a feminist film maker, that everyone seems so fast to ignore in congratulating her for ‘calling out the Academy.’
Blue Jasmine saw no other nominations or awards for a reason, and her acting deserved all it won, but Cate Blanchett chose to reinforce an industry that values male filmmakers and celebrities like Woody Allen over the children and young women they abuse and violate. That doesn’t sound very feminist to me. 

queeringcomics:

Cate Blanchett’s acceptance speech may have read feminist, and her wording was beautiful, except her thanking of Woody Allen (whose adopted daughter Dylan Farrow has come out publicly about her abuse at the hand of her proto-father) and intentional framing of him as a feminist film maker, that everyone seems so fast to ignore in congratulating her for ‘calling out the Academy.’

Blue Jasmine saw no other nominations or awards for a reason, and her acting deserved all it won, but Cate Blanchett chose to reinforce an industry that values male filmmakers and celebrities like Woody Allen over the children and young women they abuse and violate. That doesn’t sound very feminist to me. 

(via vexedness)

March 3, 2014

the-feminist-fangirl:

I care about the problems of men. I care that the patriarchy tells men that they have to be stoic beasts incapable of emotion. I care that the patriarchy tells men that they are lust-filled monsters incapable of controlling their own libidos. I care that the patriarchy tells men that they cannot be raped or assaulted because the patriarchy believes women are too weak and inferior to be dangerous.

Feminists did not do this to you, other men did.

(via vexedness)

March 3, 2014
"What many people do not know is that the use of standardized tests has its origins in the Eugenics movement, where basic tenets assert that certain races are inferior to others biologically and intellectually."

Karen Lewis, President of the Chicago Teachers Union

Standardized testing and the Eugenics movement »

A MUST read by Chicago Teachers Union president Karen Lewis. Standardized testing isn’t about improving education, it’s a way for the system to sort out which kids are meant to succeed and which are destined failure.

(via socialismartnature)

(via rabbleprochoice)

March 3, 2014
popsandculture:

Best still ever.

popsandculture:

Best still ever.

(via sinatragal)

March 3, 2014

(Source: causeallkindsoftrouble, via timemachineyeah)

March 3, 2014

(Source: dancewhatyoufeeeel, via thewomaninthemoon)

2:11am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZjsrZy192g-UV
  
Filed under: omg 
March 3, 2014

redreznikv:

Meryl Streep || 86th Academy Awards

(via thewomaninthemoon)

March 3, 2014

fionagoddess:

Lupita Nyong’o  | 86th Annual Academy Awards (March 2, 2014)

(Source: fionagoddess, via pushtheheart)

March 3, 2014

"I feel very fortunate to be in this position, and I know that it means more to people because I am an African and I am dark-skinned. In many ways me being on the scene is doing for little girls everywhere what Oprah Winfrey and Whoopi Goldberg did for me. My world exploded by them being on screen. Hopefully I will inspire and be meaningful to other people."

"I feel very fortunate to be in this position, and I know that it means more to people because I am an African and I am dark-skinned. In many ways me being on the scene is doing for little girls everywhere what Oprah Winfrey and Whoopi Goldberg did for me. My world exploded by them being on screen. Hopefully I will inspire and be meaningful to other people."

(Source: coeur-bleu, via totally-toasty)

March 1, 2014

megachikorita:

you kids these days with your rapidly growing concern for the state of the world and your knowledge of important issues at increasingly younger ages despite having been told your opinions don’t matter by the adults who put you in these situations

(via totally-toasty)

February 27, 2014

gradientlair:

justcallmesushi:

"We’re learning a lot about this thing called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This war time disease. This combat fatigue diagnosis. And we read something worth sharing. Fact, urban youth are twice as likely to get Post Traumatic Stress Disorder than soldiers who are coming home from war. So tell me, what’s the difference between homicide in the streets and bloodshed on the battlefields of Iraq. […] The only difference there is between a soldier with PTSD and one of my students with it is that a soldier gets to leave the battlefield, while my kids go home to it."

Javon Johnson & Terisa Siagatonu- “PTSD”

This poem is so powerful. 

What does “neurotypical” look like for the descendants of slaves? What is “normal” mental health when Black people deal with racism and its repercussions on the hour? 

(via like-air-i-rise)